Monday, March 25, 2013

Federation Arts and Crafts


Federation Arts and Crafts style


[previous page: Federation Filigree style Next page: Federation Bungalow style]

Examples of Federation Arts and Crafts housing style:

The Bunyas, 1-5 Rogers Avenue Haberfield, off Parramatta Road
The Bunyas, 1-5 Rogers Avenue Haberfield, off Parramatta Road
Advertised as "Haberfield's Finest Federation Home"
20 Ramsay Street Haberfield
20 Ramsay Street Haberfield

Gallery of Federation Arts and Crafts Houses in Sydney

'Ailsa' 33 Shellcove Road, Neutral Bay
'Ailsa' 33 Shellcove Road, Neutral Bay
St Ellero' 5 Appian Way Burwood, NSW
St Ellero' 5 Appian Way Burwood, NSW
'Erica' 21 Appian Way Burwood NSW
'Erica' 21 Appian Way Burwood NSW
318 Burwood Rd Burwood TN.jpg
'Mounterry' 318 Burwood Rd Burwood
f984e360-30ed-4191-9c48-edab2a29e5ac_FS.jpg
'Rowardennan' 5 Warrawee Avenue, Warrawee

Pibrac, Pibrac Avenue Warrawee
Pibrac, Pibrac Avenue Warrawee

1waterst12_01.jpg
1 Water Street Wahroonga'Westholme' c1894
Craignairn, 37 Burns Road, Wahroonga
Craignairn, 37 Burns Road, Wahroonga
JoselandHouse.JPG
Malvern, 41 Burns Road, Wahroonga

The Federation Arts and Craft style had its origins in England, where architects were reacting to the impersonal nature of the Industrial Revolution.
  • Crafts and handiwork were emphasised to give architecture the "human touch".
  • Australian Federation Arts and Crafts buildings were generally small-scale to medium-scale and predominantly residential.

From Sydney Architecture:
  • As its name implies this (Arts and Craft) style was concerned with the integration of art into everyday life through the medium of craftsmanship.
  • There is a strong flavour of morality, with stress on the truthful use of materials and the honest expression of function.
  • Arts and Crafts buildings are unpretentious and informal, evoking an atmosphere of comfortable familiarity.

Hollowforth2.jpg
Hollowforth, Neutral Bay, by Architect Edward Jeaffreson Jackson

Redleaf, 8 Redleaf Ave, Wahroonga NSW
Redleaf, 8 Redleaf Ave, Wahroonga NSW

William Morris

In nineteenth-century England... William Morris, (was the) father of the Arts and Crafts movement. Dismayed by the effects of the Industrial Revolution and inspired by Ruskin, Morris tried to put art into a broadly based social context through the reestablishment of handicraft methods reminiscent of a rural, pre-industrial age.

English Arts and Crafts Architects

  • C. F. A. Voysey and Philip Webb were important Arts and Crafts architects in England. Also Hugh Baillie Scott.
  • In the United States, Gustav Stickley promoted the ‘Craftsman’ image in architecture, interior design and furniture.
  • In Australia the important Arts and Crafts Architects were Victorians Walter Butler, Harold Desbrowe-Annear, and Guyon Purchas. Later architects were Rodney Alsop, WAM Blackett and Philip Hudson.
Front_view_Gables_C17_C1768.jpg
The Gables, in Spruson Street Cremorne, by BJ Waterhouse
f984e360-30ed-4191-9c48-edab2a29e5ac_FS.jpg
Rowerdennan 1913, 5 Warrawee Avenue Warrawee by BJ Waterhouse

Australian Arts and Crafts Architects


Famous Australian Arts and Crafts homes

Outstanding examples are Glyn, Kooyong road, Toorak, Victoria; The Crossways, Martin Road, Centennial Park, New South Wales; and Erica, Appian Way, Burwood, New South Wales.

1. Glyn 224 Kooyong Road, Toorak Victoria


Glyn, Toorak 2.jpg

Glyn was designed by architect Rodney Alsop for the wealthy financier, pastoralist and politician Sir Edward Miller (1848-1932). The house was constructed in the Arts and Crafts idiom, with reinforced concrete walls, finished with a distinctive render with white quartz pebbles pushed into the surface, resting on a deep brick plinth. This render finish has subsequently been painted over. It was complemented by gables and steeply sloping roof slopes with all surfaces clad in terracotta shingles. The interior contains many distinctive features, particularly timber panelling, carved woodwork, stained glass and beaten metal ornamentation. The building was positioned at the top of a hill on a succession of terraces and towered above the extensive grounds as they sloped down to a gully on the south east side.
GLYN SOHE 2008 medium 1.jpg
Glyn, Toorak, showing exposed rafter ends, tapering chimneys and massed windows typical of Federation Arts and Crafts Style
Glyn exhibits all the classic aspects of the Arts & Crafts movement emphasising picturesque massing, references to vernacular architecture and the exposure of building materials and textures.

The original fireplaces, light fittings, switch plates and joinery were rare examples of English Arts and Crafts influence in Australia, although some of these features have since been lost. Each room has a different decorative treatment. An interesting Australian touch is the eucalypt decorative scheme in the main hall, stair hall, entrance hall and upstairs gallery.

Glyn is also important early example of reinforced concrete being used in residential construction.
Glyn, Entrance Hall 4.jpgGlyn, Upper Hall 3.jpg

2. The Crossways, Centennial Park NSW

File:Crossways.JPG
File:Crossways.JPG

The Crossways is a fine example of the international design 'Arts and Crafts Movement style' , a house of historical significance that was designed by Waterhouse and Lake and built in 1908.[12]
  • The Crossways was built as part of the subdivision of 1904 that created the suburb, and was the home of physician/surgeon Dr Craig Gordon.
    external image how2_420x293.jpg
    external image how2_420x293.jpg
  • It is one of the finest examples of the Federation Arts & Crafts style in Australia, and one of the finest works of architect B.J. Waterhouse of Waterhouse & Lake.
  • It includes recognisable Arts and Crafts elements such as the roughcast walls and irregular windows, but its style is broad and there is even a castellated section of wall at the side.
  • The seven-bedroom home is known as one of Sydney's finest estates and is filled with luxurious details:
    • The floors in the drawing room, dining room, entrance hall and library are antique parquet taken from a French chateau.
    • The fireplaces are made of Sienna marble.
    • The drapes, curtain and carpets are French and English imports, and the La Cornue gas stove in the kitchen is the only one ever brought to Australia from France for residential use.
    • The chandeliers are from a home in England, and the bathrooms are clad in marble.
    • The private, half-acre property has a secret garden and a swimming pool shielded with high hedges.

3. Erica, Appian Way, (Hoskings Estate) Burwood, NSW


File:SydneyBuilding0126.jpg
File:SydneyBuilding0126.jpg


Erica, 21 the Appian Way, is the most unusual house in the estate. Also known as the Hoskins Estate, Appian Way was a model housing estate conceived by a wealthy industrialist, George J. Hoskins on 8 hectares of land that he purchased at the start of the 20th century.[2] Built between 1903 and 1911, the estate of 36 Federation houses was created with his designer and builder William Richards to present an appropriate setting opposite the Hoskins St Cloud mansion on Burwood Road.[3]

Erica has all external walls finished in roughcast render except for the shingles in the gable ends. The roof is slate, and the verandah roof is supported on tapered, sleekly rounded brick piers. An elongated tapering chimney springs from an extraordinary stepped parapet which slices asymmetircally across the smaller of the two gables facing the street. In the windows, small rectangular panes of convex glass are set in lead cames. Erica shows its Arts and Crafts flavour through the use of roughcast render, slate on the roof and Voysey-esque treatement of the chimneys. [1]


Australian Arts and Crafts Buildings

In Australia, Federation Arts and Crafts Buildings are domestic in scale and make free use of traditional (usually English) motifs to achieve an unassuming, homely, well-established character.

Babworth House, Darling Point showing external rafters
Babworth House, Darling Point showing external rafters
  • Designers aimed for informality in planning, massing, windows and landscaping.
    Highlands_024-640w.jpg
    The Highlands, 1890's heritage listed shingle style, 9 Highlands Avenue, Wahroonga, NSW, by famed architect John Horbury Hunt
  • The roof is a dominant element, featuring gables (with barges or parapets) and/or hips of medium to steep pitch and prominent eaves.
  • Usually rafter ends are exposed, or the rafters themselves are visible under the eaves.
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Keynsham 29 Shellcove Road NEUTRAL BAY
JoselandHouse.JPG
'Malvern', Sydney Architect Howard Joseland's home at 41 Burns Road, Wahroonga
  • Tall, tapering chimneys, battered wall- buttresses and bay windows are characteristic elements of the style.
  • Roof-top attic or 'spy' windows are massed together in twos or threes or sometimes even more.
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'Westholme' c1894 – 1 Water Street Wahroonga
1waterst10_01.jpg
Another view of 'Westholme' c1894 – 1 Water Street Wahroonga
  • Pebbledash stucco (roughcast) was commonly used as an exterior wall finish, together with other materials having earthy, ‘natural’ colours and textures.
    4ecada397bd719d55a0001fb.jpg
    Matakana, 28 Lucinda Avenue, Wahroonga
  • Interiors frequently display timber panelling and sturdy ceiling beams.

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Living room with timber trim, ceiling
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Dining Room with Fretwork Arch
1 Water Street Wahroonga 'Westholme' c1894

  • Touches of Art Nouveau detail are common, both externally and internally. - Sydney Architecture:
    Babworth House interior
    Babworth House interior

Federation Arts and Crafts Style

One of the key design and architecture styles of the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Typical Federation features in Australia are:
  • white, roughcast render
    2009201194_10_FS.jpg
    Keynsham 29 Shellcove Road NEUTRAL BAY
  • everything being exposed to explain the construction such as wooden pegs in beams, and bare stone and brick
     'St Ellero' 5 Appian Way Burwood, New South Wales
    'St Ellero' 5 Appian Way Burwood, New South Wales
  • rough-cast (stone/cement stucco) or occasionaly, pebble dash
  • visible rafters under the eaves
  • stone dressed window and door openings
    'Mounterry' 318 Liverpool Road Burwood NSW
    'Mounterry' 318 Liverpool Road Burwood NSW
  • low rooflines, dominant roof
  • asymmetric frontage
    Tulkiyan is of State significance as an important, intact example of a fine Arts & Crafts suburban villa, designed by eminent Edwardian architect B.J. Waterhouse
    Tulkiyan is of State significance as an important, intact example of a fine Arts & Crafts suburban villa, designed by eminent Edwardian architect B.J. Waterhouse
Certain tendencies stand out:
  • reformist neo-gothic influences,
Fairwater 560 New South Head Road, Double Bay, NSW by Architect John Horbury Hunt
Fairwater 560 New South Head Road, Double Bay, NSW by Architect John Horbury Hunt
  • rustic and "cottagey" surfaces,
    Highlands_030-640wx.jpg
  • repeating designs,
    'Erica' 21 Appian Way Burwood NSW Australia
    'Erica' 21 Appian Way Burwood NSW Australia
  • vertical and elongated forms.
    Federation Arts & Crafts Home, Bellevue Hill
    Federation Arts & Crafts Home, Bellevue Hill
  • Some products were deliberately left slightly unfinished, resulting in a certain rustic and robust effect,
    'Ailsa' 33 Shellcove Road, Neutral Bay
    'Ailsa' 33 Shellcove Road, Neutral Bay
  • Showcases the beauty inherent in craft
    Cowper Rose, 45 Cowper Street, Randwick NSW
    Cowper Rose, 45 Cowper Street, Randwick NSW

American Influences

Wright's home in Oak Park, Illinois
Wright's home in Oak Park, Illinois
The Gamble House, Pasadena, California, by Greene and Greene
The Gamble House, Pasadena, California, by Greene and Greene
Stickley Craftsman House: Shingled House Exterior view from the front.
Stickley Craftsman House: Shingled House Exterior view from the front.

  1. ^ Richard Apperly, A Controlled Near-Chaos, Chapter 3, page 43 of Towards the Dawn, edited b Trevor Howells and Michael Nicholson

Thursday, March 21, 2013

Art Nouveau and Federation style


Art Nouveau and Federation Architecture


[Previous post: Federation Renovation ...next post: ]

A description of Art Nouveau published in Pan magazine of Hermann Obrist's wall hangingCyclamen (1894) described it as "sudden violent curves generated by the crack of a whip", which (description) became well known during the early spread of Art Nouveau.[28

Subsequently, not only did the work itself become better known as The Whiplash but the term "whiplash" is frequently applied to the characteristic curves employed by Art Nouveau artists.[28] Such decorative "whiplash" motifs, formed by dynamic, undulating, and flowing lines in a syncopated rhythm, are found throughout the architecture, painting, sculpture, and other forms of Art Nouveau design.

  • Art Nouveau architecture made use of many technological innovations of the late 19th century, especially the use of exposed iron and large, irregularly shaped pieces of glass for architecture.
  • By the start of World War I, however, the stylised nature of Art Nouveau design—which was expensive to produce—began to be disused in favour of more streamlined, rectilinearmodernism, which was cheaper and thought to be more faithful to the plainer industrialaesthetic that became Art Deco.

external image 170px-Immeuble_rue_de_l%27%C3%A9glise_d%C3%A9tail_Porte.jpgexternal image magnify-clip.pngArt Nouveau is rarely so fully in control of architecture: doorway at place Etienne Pernet, 24 (Paris 15e), 1905 Alfred Wagon, architect.external image 475px-MackmurdoWren1883.gif
The book-cover by Arthur Mackmurdo forWren's City Churches (1883)
external image 170px-CasaBatllo_0170.JPG
external image magnify-clip.pngThe Casa Batll√≥, already built in 1877, was remodelled in the Barcelona manifestation of Art Nouveau, modernisme, by Antoni Gaud√≠ and Josep Maria Jujol during 1904–1906
external image 200px-Casa_Arte_Nova_Aveiro_by_Henrique_Matos_02.jpg
external image magnify-clip.pngArt Nouveau House in Aveiro, Portugal

Art Nouveau Architects

Although no significant artists in Australia are linked to the art nouveau movement, many buildings throughout Australia were designed in the art nouveau style. In Melbourne, the Victorian Arts Society, Milton House, Melbourne Sports Depot, City Baths, Conservatory of Music and Melba Hall, Paston Building, and Empire Works Building all reflect the Art Nouveau style.[1] (see below)
external image art-nouveau1.s600x600.jpg
Architecture of French Hector Guimard
external image DSC_9556+copy.jpg
Horta's house-studio. Detail of the facade
Three famous Art Nouveau architects made quite an impact in the short span of time when the Art Nouveau style was all the rage. Victor Horta, Paul Hankar and Hector Guimard set out to tranform the most plain and functional buildings, houses, hotels, public works buildings and even subway entrances, into works of art. They took inspiration from the beauty inherent in nature as they designed buildings that allowed for flowing, curvaceous lines and organic shapes. These three architects left behind a legacy of beauty and grace.

Art Nouveau Elements

You can identify Art Nouveau style art and architecture by looking for some specific elements.[2]
  • Flowing Lines: Art Nouveau is characterized by graceful, sinuous lines. The lines are rarely angular.
  • Violent Curves: Some artists referred to the curves in Art Nouveau works as whiplash curves. Rhythmic patterns of curvy lines are characteristic of this art style. These curvy lines connect the images in the art and can even be found in beautified plain items, such as dishes, eating utensils, hardware and furniture.
  • Organic Subject Matter: You'll find plenty of flowers, leaves, vines, grass, seaweed, insects and other organic images in Art Nouveau jewelry, hardware, windows and architecture. Examples include images of birds etched into window frames or curled around each other on fabric for upholstery, or abstract lilies drifting around and connecting to each other on dinnerware.
  • New Materials: Instead of classic gemstones, Art Nouveau jewelers opted to work with opals and semiprecious stones. Glass art reached a new level of popularity as Louis Comfort Tiffany and Charles Rennie Mackintosh took interest in the new art style. Molded glass, animal horns and ivory tusks became commonly used materials.
  • Resistance of Classical Restrictions: Instead of limiting art to painting on a canvas or sculpting out of marble, Art Nouveau artists and architects looked for ways to make everyday objects into pieces of art. A doorknocker might be molded to look like a dragonfly; an entranceway might be graced by vine-like lines in the molding. You can find a classic example of this by studying the entrances designed for the Paris Metro by Hector Guimard.
cabinet-vitrine
cabinet-vitrine
Tearoom
Tearoom
Tiffany lamp
Tiffany lamp
Gustave Serrurier-Bovy - Belgian (1858-1910) Cabinet-vitrine, 1899 narra and ash with copper and enamel mounts The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd MackloweCharles Rennie Mackintosh - Scottish (1868-1928)Ladies' Luncheon Room from Miss Cranston's Ingram Street Tearooms, 1900 Glasgow Museums, Art Gallery and Museum, KelvingroveTiffany Studios American (firm active 1902-1932) Dragonfly table lamp, c. 1910 stained glass and bronze Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, Gift of Walter P. Chrysler[4]

Native flora and fauna

The idea of using native materials pre-dates the introduction of Art Nouveau as does the idea of using native flora and fauna. In fact natural motifs were widely used in the stucco and brick relief sculpture in Romanesque revival buildings in the 1880s and 1890s, particularly in Melbourne.
The Robert Prenzel wardrobe
The Robert Prenzel wardrobe
A Harvey school gum-nut art nouveau ashtray, Australian circa 1930
A Harvey school gum-nut art nouveau ashtray, Australian circa 1930
Robert Prenzel, The Davies Suite,three-piece suite of bedroom furniture (c1910).Collection: Art Gallery of Ballarat, Victoria. "Prenzel took the prevailing art nouveau style, with its elegant simplicity and sinuous lines, and incorporated it into symbols reflecting the dawning nationalism of that Federation era, with its cult of the wattle and other Australian motifs.

"This furniture encapsulated that sense of pride in the nation and you celebrated your pride by covering things with native flora and fauna. For a 10-year period between 1905 and World War I, Prenzel was extraordinarily popular and basically every grand house in western Victoria had a staircase or furniture by him."[3]* See also Robert Prenzel - Australia's Master Carver
Harvey school:L. J Harvey was an important practitioner and teacher in the arts and crafts movement in Queensland and a figure of national significance. Harvey was an accomplished artist, carver, ceramist and sculptor, as well as the inspiration of the largest school of Art Pottery in Australia.

In 1938 Harvey opened an applied art school in Adelaide Street, Brisbane and taught a wide range of people and was associated with the most significant Queensland artists of his day. Daisy Nosworthy and Florence Bland are just two students [4]* See also The Harvey School Collection at Qld Art Gallery

Gumnut Artistry of May Gibbs:See also page Nutcote House of May Gibbs


The Gumnut Ball
The Gumnut Ball
Art School in 'Little Ragged Blossum'
Art School in 'Little Ragged Blossum'
'More than a Fairy Tale. An Artistic Life' by Robert Holden and Jane Brummitt
'More than a Fairy Tale. An Artistic Life' by Robert Holden and Jane Brummitt
Gumnuts  - a rear view.
Gumnuts - a rear view.

external image snug1.gifexternal image nuttybub.jpgexternal image scribble.jpgexternal image lonehand.jpg
Gum nuts, kangaroos, emu, kookaburra and such, were part of Arts and Crafts decorative design and blossomed profusely during Art Nouveau. But the influence on Australia of William Morris' movement and his followers, such as architect C. R. Ashbee's arguments for a cottage design or style was limited more to spiritual resolve than material substance, and to a limited audience.
For architecture the potent ideas in England of those supporting the medieval cottage led to more flexible ideas of the bungalow which evolved in England and then matured in America at the turn of the century.
  • Art Nouveau offered no direct lineage to the future as did the theoretically stronger Arts and Crafts movement.
  • Art Nouveau tended to be superficial in its application to architecture.
  • Buildings containing elements of Art Nouveau were usually part of the cottage ideas or the relatively new aberrations of Queen Anne revival, a rather heavy architecture of many angular roof forms and white posted verandahs.
  • Artarmon's Art Nouveau Style Leadlights


    Features of an Art Nouveau style leadlight:
    • Long, flowing curved lines
    • Plant motifs – flowers, leaves, stems
    • Large proportion is coloured glass
    • Australian flora and fauna
external image Art%2520Nouveau%2520Style%2520Leadlight%2520Windows.jpg

external image Art%2520Nouveau%2520Style%2520Leadlight%2520Windows2.jpg
external image Img_4593.jpg

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Australian Art Nouveau Housing

Home with Art Nouveau elements, London Street, Enmore, NSW
Home with Art Nouveau elements, London Street, Enmore, NSW


external image 5929326461_eb9c4b3f1a_z.jpg

A Large Art Nouveau Villa - Moonee Ponds
external image 5851979755_8cb1016d82_z.jpg
A Large Art Nouveau Villa - Travancore
This magnificent Art Nouveau style villa of grand proportions is situated inSydenham Street in the Melbourne suburb of Moonee Ponds.
Built in the years immediately following Australian Federation (1901).
The house's pale painted stuccoed brick and Art Nouveau fretwork give
it a wonderfully light feel. However, it is the villa's magnificent Art Nouveau
stained glass windows of stylised roses that are its real feature.
This magnificent Art Nouveau style villa of grand proportions is situated in aquiet, tree lined street in the Melbourne suburb of Travancore.
The wonderful facade treatment, (now enclosed) balcony and stained glass
windows of stylised roses are beautifully crafted.
This very spacious stand alone double brick residence with several gables
is one of the grandest residences in the neighbourhood.
Art Nouveau style from the 1920s
Art Nouveau style from the 1920s
external image 5706222821_67de06f6cf_z.jpg
Art Nouveau in AutumnA wonderful concoction of Art Nouveau fretwork and terracotta tiles appear on a grand Edwardian villa in a leafy tree lined street of the Melbourne suburb of Elwood.

Art Nouveau Stained Glass Bay Window - Elwood
Art Nouveau Stained Glass Bay Window - Elwood
Art Nouveau Stained Glass Bay Window - Elwood
Art Nouveau Stained Glass Bay Window - Elwood
"Nocklofty" Federation Style Villa - Royal Parade, Parkville
"Nocklofty" Federation Style Villa - Royal Parade, Parkville
web-Haberfield037_edited-we.jpg
Haberfield Federation House
  • Art Nouveau was applied to a variety of tried and successful architectural styles including the Arts and Crafts cottage.
  • The mix of Arts and Crafts with Art Nouveau, cannot be too heavily stressed. The pure new art of Belgium and Europe arrived in Australia about 1900 or so, but it was an English derivation organized about cottage and Romanesque ideas and forms.
  • More often than not it was a heavily massed architecture with surfaces of glass or white wood which received a touch of Art Nouveau form, line or colour.
  • Historian John Freeland's statement that in the hands of Australian followers and imitators ‘Art Nouveau was sterilized into utter superficiality’
Appian Way Conservation Area, Burwood NSW
Appian Way Conservation Area, Burwood NSW
Verona, 2 Appian Way, Burwood NSW
Verona, 2 Appian Way, Burwood NSW
This was true of most of Art Nouveau architecture. The very tenuous whipped lines extending into the architecture of Frenchman Hector Guimard's buildings, as exemplified in his designs for the Paris Metro stations, or the full forms and colour of the Spaniard Antoni Gaudi which found a completeness throughout his buildings, in particular the Casa Batlo, Barcelona, have few equals in the rest of Europe and none in Australia.

Melbourne Art Nouveau Victorian ArchitectureHistorian John Freeland's statement that in the hands of Australian followers and imitators ‘Art Nouveau was sterilized into utter superficiality’ had two implications:
  • as a means to a full design there was little in Art Nouveau to offer the architect and
  • those who tried, failed the offering.
Victorian Artists Society, MELBOURNE.jpgThe Auditorium, 167-171 Collins Street, MELBOURNE.jpg
Victorian Artists SocietyThe Auditorium: 167-171 Collins Street, MELBOURNE

House interiors:

The paradox of stylistic mix is revealed in two interiors. The first was photographed in 1910
Above is the interior of an Australian house showing classical elements (cornice, flower stand and colonettes), Queen Anne chairs, Victorian overstuffed furniture and furnishings, Arts and Crafts end tables, Edwardian tiles and fireplace and Art Nouveau screen. 
The other interior was published in Sydney in 1908 and was of a design usually defined as geometric Art Nouveau.

House Interior 1910.jpgGreen Bedroom  1908.jpg

Launceston and Sydney interiors:

external image Werona%252014667838_10_x.jpgexternal image Werona%252014667838_09_x.jpg
Werona Bed and Breakfast Launceston TasmaniaWerona Bed and Breakfast Launceston Tasmania

Alistair Brae Pymble
Alistair Brae Pymble

18 Frenchmans Road, RANDWICK
18 Frenchmans Road, RANDWICK

Art Nouveau Interior in Haberfield NSW

Beautiful Art Nouveau leadlined glass casement windows
Beautiful Art Nouveau leadlined glass casement windows



Architect Harold Desbrowe Annear

Harold Desbrowe-Annear designed house
Harold Desbrowe-Annear designed house
Peter Crone outside his beloved Desbrowe-Annear home, Chadwick House in Eaglemont. Photo: Eddie Jim, 9 June 2011.
Peter Crone outside his beloved Desbrowe-Annear home, Chadwick House in Eaglemont. Photo: Eddie Jim, 9 June 2011.
Peter Crone outside his beloved Desbrowe-Annear home,Chadwick House in Eaglemont. Photo: Eddie Jim, 9 June 2011.
A 1903 Desbrowe-Annear house.
A 1903 Desbrowe-Annear house.

1903 Desbrowe-Annear house. Photo: Neil Newitt
Three houses by Harold Desbrowe Annear in 1902–3 for a steep site on The Eyrie, Eaglemont, Victoria, were the fullest, most complete Art Nouveau in Australia. They were not the pure English or European variety.
  • They owed a great deal to the traditional nineteenth century, something to Queen Anne, and to Queensland verandah domestic style of a bulk raised on posts (‘stumps’) with wood dominating structure, surface and ornamentation.
  • Annear's designs had subtle changes in level within, sliding doors to change spatial appearance and size, as well as rather nontraditional plan forms, all suggesting ideas of the open plan.
  • The exterior forms were unpretentious and related to the bungalow by their informalarrangement and materials. Ornamental characteristics of rhythmical verticals in a suggested half-timbering were contrasted by sweeping curves which recalled Art Nouveau and the Queensland precedents.
  • Their overall effect, therefore, was related to Art Nouveau: fluidity of space and form, strong sweeping lines and the whole conceived as a related unit without traditional or formal encumbrances such as ornament or axiality
  • But the Annear houses (one was his own) were exceptions. In general, Art Nouveau suffered from the general misconceptions of eclecticism and resulted in another pastiche.[5]
Architect Peter Crone's meticulously restored home, Chadwick House in Eaglemont, designed by Harold Desbrowe-Annear in 1903. Photo: Neil Newitt
Architect Peter Crone's meticulously restored home, Chadwick House in Eaglemont, designed by Harold Desbrowe-Annear in 1903. Photo: Neil Newitt
[6] Click for more photos

Architect Robert Joseph Haddon

Robert Joseph Haddon, an English trained architect, was one of the few to work in the Art Nouveau style in Australia.
ANSELM SOHE 2008
ANSELM SOHE 2008

ANSELM SOHE 2008
ANSELM SOHE 2008
ANSELM SOHE 2008

ANSELM SOHE 2008
‘Anselm’ his own home in Caulfield Melbourne contains wave like tiles in the Art Nouveau style in the bathroom and he applied the sinuous Art Nouveau lines to the outside brickwork. Others used the stylised floral forms of Art Nouveau with the Australian Waratah, flannel flower, lyre birds, emus and kangaroo motifs.[7]

  1. ^ http://www.arteducation.com.au/art-movements/art-nouveau.php
  2. ^ http://www.life123.com/arts-culture/architecture-2/art-nouveau/art-nouveau-style.shtml
  3. ^ http://www.theaustralian.com.au/arts/review/when-federation-met-art-nouveau/story-fn9n8gph-1226591781730
  4. ^ http://blogs.slq.qld.gov.au/jol/2011/07/26/the-work-of-l-j-harvey-and-his-school/
  5. ^ Australian Architecture 1901-51: Sources of Modernism
  6. ^ http://news.domain.com.au/domain/architects/homes-of-national-importance-on-display-20110615-1g3k1.html
  7. ^ http://sampleboardonlineinaustralia.blogspot.com.au/2010/05/aussie-federation-art-nouveau.html